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Post Rock District

Food Preservation

 

Food preservation can save you time and money, if done properly.  Special precautions have to be taken to ensure that our food is safe from bacteria growth.  We strongly recommend that you only use tested preservation recipes.

Our local offices are equipped with Pressure Dial Guage Testing Units that are available to test your personal dial gauges on your pressure canners.  It is recommended that gauges are checked every year, please contact your local office to set up a time to have your gauge checked.

 K-State Extension Food Safety Site  

Preserving recipes

National Center for Food Preservation this is based at the University of Georgia and the national site for food preservation materials. 

 

Below are videos to help you learn how to safely can foods at home featuring Karen Blakeslee, our Rapid Response Center Coordinator. These videos were produced by K-State Research and Extension News Media Services and funded by a grant from the Kansas Health Foundation.

 

Recommended Recipes

K-State Research and Extension food safety specialist Karen Blakeslee offers general tips about home canning and preserving, including the best sources for safe and tasty recipes.

Choosing the Right Recipe (What to Avoid)

Many families treasure various recipes handed down through the generations--but K-State Research and Extension food safety specialist Karen Blakeslee says that when it comes to home canning and preserving, newer recipes are safer.

The Science Behind Home Canning

You might think that you can take just any vegetable and can it in any jar you choose--but K-State Research and Extension food safety specialist Karen Blakeslee explains some of the science behind safe home canning and preserving.

Preventing Botulism in Home Canning

One of the greatest food safety risks of home canning is botulism (BAH-chew-liz-im), a food-borne illness cause by a bacteria frequently found in improperly canned/preserved food. K-State Research and Extension food safety specialist Karen Blakeslee explains how this potentially-fatal illness can be avoided.

 

Preserve It Safe